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How To Write A Discussion Essay In Ielts

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IELTS How to write a discussion essay outline (part 1 of 2) на

IELTS How to write a discussion essay outline (part 1 of 2)

Oh no! My IELTS test is coming, and I am not prepared! Sound familiar? In this video I will give you tips on how to do well on one of the hardest parts of the IELTS. I will explain a specific type of question you may find in the Reading module of the IELTS: True, False, or Not Given. After watching this class, you can try to do some practice questions. After all, practice makes perfect. ielts-reading-strategies/

Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, we are going to be looking at the IELTS, that scary test a lot of you have to do. We're going to look at, specifically, one type of reading question for the academic reading. So this isn't for the general; it's for the academic reading. We're going to talk about the question that has to do with "true, false, or not given". So this is a specific question. It may or may not be on your test, but I think, personally, this is one of the most difficult questions on the reading section of the IELTS. So I'm going to give you some tips and strategies on how to do well on this section.

Okay, so let's get started. In this section, what you are going to find is a reading passage. So you will have a long passage on maybe cybercrime, maybe food security, on the history of the Internet -- it can be on anything. After the passage, there will be some statements, some facts, okay? What you need to do is you need to say if the fact matches -- if it's true based on the reading, if it's false based on the reading, or if the information is not given in the reading. So I will explain "true", "false", "not given" in detail in just a minute.

Okay. What else to know about the "true, false, or not given"? Another important thing about this question is we're not talking about the question that has to do with the writer's opinion. There's a very similar question on the IELTS that asks about the writer's opinion. That's the "yes, no, not given". This is only on "true, false, not given", not "yes, no, not given". Just -- hopefully, that will clear up any confusion.

Okay. So let's get started. What do they mean by "true" in these questions? When would you write "true"? I will show you. You can write "true" or "T". "T" is shorter. If there is a fact and it is clearly written, you write "T". If the fact is clearly written in the reading, you would write "T". You'll often see synonyms, and, again, write "T" only if you actually see this fact written. If you know the fact is true, but it's not written, don't write "true". Only write "true" if, with your eyes, you read it, and you see it in the fact. You see it in the reading; write "true". So I'll give you an example of this type of question. Here is just a part of a passage. The reading is a lot longer, but here is a short version that you might find on the IELTS. "This increase in cybercrime has alarmed many experts." So it would be a long passage. You might see something like that. And then, at the end of the reading, one of the statements you might see might say, "Cyber crime is on the rise." You need to say if this is "true", "false", or "not given".

So how do you know if it's "true", "false", or "not given"? My advice to you is first, read the statement: "Cyber crime is on the rise"; underline any key words. "Cyber crime" -- this is a keyword. "is on the 'rise'" -- that's a keyword, okay? Then you go back to the reading passage, and you quickly scan for these words or synonyms. What are "synonyms"? "Synonyms" are words that mean the same thing but are different words. So what is a synonym of "rise"? "Increase", "go up", okay? So let's see if we can find "cyber crime" or "rise". So I would scan the passage -- oh, the word "increase", "cybercrime". So "rise", "increase", okay. So I found a synonym. Now, it's important for me to read very carefully to see if there are any contradictions. What does the sentence say? Does it really match? "This increase in cyber crime has alarmed many experts." "Cyber crime is on the rise." Both of these -- both the reading passage and the fact or the statement are saying cyber crime is increasing. It's going up. So that would mean it's true. So I could write a "T" beside this, "true".

Okay. One thing to look out for with "true": Sometimes you will see words like "some", "all", "only", "never", "usually", "often", "sometimes". Be careful with these words, okay? Because if it says, "Some people in Canada like to eat poutine", and you see the sentence saying, "Poutine is always eaten by Canadians", even though you see the two words -- oh, "poutine", "poutine" -- one says "always", one says "some". So this would not be a true statement. So be on the lookout for "some", "all", "only", "never", "usually". This is where they try to trick you on the IELTS.

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Practice using these words in the comments section of this video!

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Here are the words as they appear in the video:

1. precursor
• (S)"My interest in geography was the precursor to my studies in cartography."
• (W)"Thus, this example makes it clear that a university education acts as a precursor to career growth."

2. catalyze
• (S)"The people I meet at business networking evenings in my city often catalyze professional opportunities."
• (W) "Firstly, uniforms act as a catalyst for better classroom behaviour among students."

3. linear
• (S) "My plans for the future are fairly linear. I'm completing my undergraduate degree now and intend to follow this with a master's. Education is, therefore, in my foreseeable future."
• (W T1) "The trend depicted between the months of February and June shows linear growth from 20 XYZ to 75 XYZ."
• (W T2) "Thus, the progression from an educated background to a high level of business success is often linear."

4. correlate
• (S)"Actually, the career progression of my sister positively correlates with mine. After she left our hometown, she also experienced a significant growth in employment opportunities."
• (W T1) "The rise in automobile prices in 2008 is negatively correlated with automobile sales for the same year."

5. avenue
• (S) "My father encouraged me to study languages, and this has opened up certain avenues for friendship I would not have otherwise had. For example, I have several close Japanese-speaking friends."
• (W) "Firstly, studying a foreign language opens avenues for employment. For instance. "

6. afford
• (S) "My university grades afforded me the opportunity to study abroad."
• (W) "For example, the Chinese economic system has afforded the PRC unprecedented financial growth over the past three decades."

7. actionable
• (S) "My university professor gave me several actionable pieces of advice. But most noteworthy was his suggestion that I focus my studies on North African history, as I was both interested in it and am of Tunisian ancestry."
• (W) "Firstly, the actionable nature of the skills learned at university is clear. For instance, humanities programs like philosophy, English literature and history push students to exhibit logical progression in their thinking and writing. As these organized thought patterns are often the basis of success in business, it is clear that a link exists between the skills learned at university and the ability one has to accomplish a professional goal."

8. embody
• (S) "My father is an embodiment of a traditional military upbringing. He does everything by routine."
• (W) "Firstly, technology in the classroom has undeniable links to academic performance. The use of tablets in Korean classrooms embodies this idea perfectly."

9. fortify
• (S) "I'm taking courses in the evening after work to fortify my professional skills."
• (W) "Thus, the fact that successful attempts are being made by other developing countries to replicate China's growth fortifies the argument that the Chinese economic model is one that accelerates the elimination of poverty in undeveloped nations."

Good luck with your studies!

Another IELTS speaking section example by. This video is an IELTS speaking section interview with a native English speaker for part 2 and 3. This playlist teaches important strategies for IELTS speaking interview. Follow us on Facebook at WorldESLTutors. This video is a part in a series that instructs the steps necessary to achieve a high score, between 7 to 9, on the IETLS speaking section question. The series includes three example speaking interviews with a native Canadian English speaker. This series will teach you the skills that will help you to be successful, confident and to reach success on these questions during the speaking interview. Follow the instructions carefully and make sure to practice. Use the subtitles as necessary to help you comprehend the information. It is important to practice a lot to give full sentence answers which reflect the grammar structure of the questions. Strategies will help with fluent language, natural language and complex language. Enjoy. Follow us now on twitter @aehelp

Do you need to take the IELTS? I will teach you everything you need to get a higher score in Task 1 of the Speaking section of the exam! A lot of people have to take the IELTS exam when they immigrate or study overseas. Even if your English is good, you could get a low score in the Speaking section if you are not prepared. If you are taking this test, this video will help you. I'll tell you what to expect and give you a lot of tips and strategies to do well! To test your understanding of the video, take the quiz at ielts-speaking-task-1/ and for more IELTS tips, strategies, secrets, and sample questions and answers, go to Good Luck IELTS:

Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, we will be looking at how to do well on the speaking part of the IELTS. So the speaking part of the IELTS is divided up into three sections. Today, we're just going to be looking at section No. 1. So first of all, I will explain how to do well -- oh, sorry. First, I'll explain what happens in Part 1 of the IELTS. And from there, we'll look at some things you should do to do well and some things you shouldn't do, okay? So let's get started.

So what happens in Part 1 of the IELTS? Well, first of all, the speaking Part 1 of the IELTS is for both those taking the General IELTS exam and the Academic. So whether you're taking the Academic or the General IELTS, it's the same test with the same questions.

Okay. It lasts between four to five minutes. It's made up of first an introduction. So the examiner is going to introduce himself or herself. Then, you will introduce yourself. So for example, "Hi. My name is Emma. Nice to meet you." Okay, so there's an introduction. And then, the examiner is going to ask you some questions about yourself. So these questions aren't that difficult. Usually, they're about where you're from. So for example what city you were born in, where you grew up. They might be about work. They might be about what you study, about your friends, about your hobbies, food, sports, and another thing I don't have up here, family. Family is also common on this part of the IELTS. Okay? So usually, the examiner, after introducing himself or herself, they will talk to you about two of these topics. Okay?"

Now, the way they mark this part of the IELTS is they're looking specifically for pronunciation, okay? So can they understand what you're saying? Do you pronounce things well? They're going to be looking at fluency. So what's "fluency"? Well, do you go, "Uh, um, uh, uh" a lot during the test? Or do you speak very clearly, in a very nice rhythmic way? Do you use organizers or transitions? "First of all, secondly, finally." Do you use words like this? "Another reason." Or do you have problems speaking at a normal rate? So they look at that in fluency."

Then, they mark you also on vocabulary. Do you use words like "good, bad" a lot? Those are very low-level words. Or do you use high level words that really show off your vocabulary?"

The final thing you're marked on is grammar and accuracy. So for example, do you only use the present test for the whole test or are you able to correctly use the present tense, the past tense, present perfect, future? How well is your grammar? Okay?

So don't panic. Maybe you're weak in grammar. Maybe you make some mistakes in grammar. But you're marked equally on these four components, okay? So now, let's look at some tips on how to do well on Part 1 of the speaking part of the IELTS.

Okay. So what are some of the things we should do to get a good mark in Part 1 of the IELTS for speaking? Well, we have a list here of dos. Okay? So these are things you want to do. So the first thing that's very important is when you first meet the examiner, okay? If you're very nervous, and you don't make eye-contact, and you look at the floor the whole time, you're not going to do well on the IELTS even if your English is pretty good. So it's very important to present yourself with confidence, okay? You want to go into that test and know you're going to do well. If you think you're going to do well, you're going to do a lot better. Okay? If you think you're going to do badly, you're probably going to do badly. So think you're going to do well, and be confident. Okay?

Another important thing is be friendly. Okay. You want to smile. Body language is actually very important in the IELTS.

You want to make eye-contact, okay? So don't look at your feet. Don't look at your hands. Look at the examiner. But you don't have to stare at them, okay? Just look at them when you talk.

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About the Author: Greg Askew completed the Advanced TESOL Diploma with OnTESOL. He is currentlyteaching IELTS in the United Arab Emirates.

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Just as there are many reasons to use authentic texts when teaching IELTS, there are an equal number of considerations when choosing which texts to use. The most important consideration is whether the text is suitable for your candidates’ proficiency level. Reading requires a lot of energy, especially when dealing with unfamiliar vocabulary and structures. The greater the gap between your candidates’ level and the level required means the greater the chance they will lose motivation and focus, which is why sourcing authentic texts can be so challenging—maybe you find the perfect article but the text’s language is too sophisticated. The time it takes to source a text that ticks all the boxes might ultimately put you off using authentic texts altogether. Before giving up, consider modifying a text to achieve your target level, which may ultimately take less time than finding that perfect text. In this TESOL article I will share the process I have used for vetting and developing the texts for candidates targeting an IELTS band 5.0:

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IELTS Discussion Essay: Useful Academic Expressions смотри на

IELTS Discussion Essay: Useful Academic Expressions

Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS.
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Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started.

So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually. I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked.

Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they. Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because. " So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is.

So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off. First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes.

Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know. We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning.

So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.